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The Cask of Amontillado Instant Short Story Text & Lesson Plans

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Item #:613ISS
$8.99
SKU:
613ISS
UPC:
9781620193228
Files are available for downloading for 90 days. You may download files up to 5 times to get them onto your own devices for your own use.
The Cask of Amontillado Instant Short Story Text & Lesson Plans
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Instant Resources for The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe!

 

Whether you're looking for a short story to pair with the novel you're teaching, or you need a 2- to 3-day sub plan to use with the stories in your textbooks, Prestwick House Instant Short Story Packs go beyond basic comprehension to help students learn how to analyze literature. 

Each downloadable pack addresses key skills through 5-10 standards-based analysis questions by guiding students through a series of scaffolding graphic organizers and in-class activities. 

This Instant Short Story Pack for The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe includes:

  • Scaffolding graphic organizers and in-class activities
  • Standards-based objectives
  • Introduction and pre-reading notes
  • Complete short story text
  • Rigorous analysis questions
  • Detailed teacher's answer guide

 

About The Cask of Amontillado

“The Cask of Amontillado” was first published in 1846 and has become one of the most famous stories written by one of the most famous authors in American history. Much has changed in the 160+ years since Edgar Allan Poe wrote this story: social customs and manners, forms of travel and communication, clothing styles, taste in food and music, and so on.

What hasn’t changed is human nature. Twenty-first-century Americans experience the same hopes, fears, and passions as did the men and women of Poe’s day. Think about the devious plotting of any television or movie villain and compare it to Montresor’s passionate hatred and driving need for revenge. When you read this story, don’t just puzzle over the occasional strange word or the long and elaborate sentences. Read for every hint Poe gives to just how mad his narrator is and how horrible the fate his nemesis Fortunato is about to suffer.

By all means enjoy the plot, but don’t allow the “surprise” ending to distract you from the real horror that Poe is exploring.